Lessons from religion for 'tools for thought' communities

Lessons from religion for 'tools for thought' communities

Thinking and over-thinking

What can the 'tools for thought' community learn from religious zealots in the past? A few things it turns out


It is good to tread lightly around the topic of religion, as it is core to so many people. Nevertheless, some quirky similarities come to mind, which may be instructive for our communities.

You have evangelists sharing the good news.

Yes, I would call myself a Logseq evangelist. It's changed my life, and will change yours too, if only you leave your old ways 😉 But the Notion, Roam, and Obsidian folks will tell you the same thing, and they're also right.

There are community 'elders' (and even in one instance, a community "pope").

They need not be self-ordained as in the case above, but there are no doubt wise men and women who pave the way in each of these tools, who help us figure out the new paradigms.

People from different communities get stuck in arguments over who is right.

The arguments go into the minutiae, flogging the details of what other tools get wrong and why theirs is supreme. It may be interpreted as a personal attack if you have any reservations about their tool of choice.

How can we learn from the mistakes of religions in the past?
  • Maybe there are common underlying principles we should acknowledge instead of dismissing them offhand?
  • Even if you disagree with someone's choices, it's generally frowned upon to look down your nose at others.
  • Maybe being dogmatic about this sort of thing isn't a great way to spend your energy?
  • Finally, don't bomb people you're trying to convert. No one likes that.

Imagine how nice it would be if we all just got along. *hums John Lennon in the background*


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